Some Breakfast Ideas for Endurance Athletes

Light breakfast with boiled eggs and cup of coffee, isolated on whiteSome people like to eat the same breakfast every day, some people like to try different foods. If you are training and competing in endurance sport, it’s a good idea to vary your breakfast according to the timing and type of training session you do. This helps you to consume carbohydrates, protein and fats in different amounts, and eating different foods over the course of a week also broadens your intake of vitamins, minerals and other beneficial nutrients which support good health. Continue reading

Recipe: Thai Green Curry

Thai food may well be one of your favourite choices for eating out or getting food delivered in, and it’s a relatively healthy option. But why not make a Thai green curry at home? It makes a tasty dinner and works well after an evening training session.

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Some Nutritional New Year’s Resolutions for the Endurance Athlete

For my last blog post of 2017 – or the first of 2018, depending on when you are reading this – I thought I would draw up a short list of suggested New Year’s Resolutions for endurance sports participants to help you improve your diet and nutritional practices in 2018, with a subsequent benefit to performance. I’ve kept the list deliberately short and hopefully manageable: Continue reading

Preventing Christmas weight gain for the endurance athlete

Christmas beer

You’ve trained hard all year, and I hope that over the next couple of weeks you might be taking it a bit easier and enjoying some much deserved downtime. OK, maybe you have a short festive race planned or a long ride, but the chances are that your training volume is going to decrease for at least a few days as you spend time over Christmas with family and friends. If you are putting in fewer training hours, you are going to be burning fewer calories, and all at a time when the temptation is to indulge in all that festive food – often packed with sugar and saturated fat. So there is certainly a risk that you might gain a few pounds, and that’s going to be in the form of fat, not muscle.

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Carbohydrate and Protein Timing for Endurance Athletes

Clock face

The optimal time to eat and drink prior to, during and after exercise is an issue that all endurance athletes must contend with if they want to maximise benefits from training or perform at their best in races. It’s also been the subject of many research studies over the last 20 years or so, which has sometimes led to conflicting conclusions. So, it is good to see the well-respected International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) produce an updated position stand on Nutrient Timing recently (2017) 1, which makes practical recommendations for athletes about when to consume carbohydrate and protein. Continue reading

The Role of Gut Bacteria in Health and Performance

Picture of gut bacteria

Introduction

The role of the gut bacteria in our bodies – known as the microbiome – has been a hot topic in medical research for a while. Given the impact that our microbiome has been found to have on digestive health, immunity, energy production, ability to lose weight and even the way in which our brain functions, it has not been surprising to see sports scientists starting to examine the role of gut bacteria on athletic performance. Continue reading

Relative Energy Deficiency in Sports (RED-S) Practical Considerations for Endurance Athletes

Mountjoy et al, BJSM, 2014

I’m very pleased to welcome a guest contributor to my blog this month, Dr Nicky Keay, who is a medical doctor specialising in sports endocrinology. Dr Keay has published many papers relating to sports endocrinology (the impact of hormones on performance) and is a regular contributor to the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM) and the British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine (BASEM). She will be organising and chairing the annual BASEM spring conference.

At the end of Dr Keay’s article, I have added some practical nutritional tips to help athletes avoid or recover from RED-S. Continue reading

Beetroot, feta & quinoa salad – A lunch recipe for endurance athletes

recipe for endurance athletes - beetroot, feta and quinoa - by Jo Scott-Dalgleish

This salad makes a great packed lunch to take to work on days when you are training in the early evening, with a good mix of quinoa and starchy vegetables to provide carbohydrate and protein from feta cheese, beans and quinoa. And, of course, the nitrates in the beetroot may help with stamina. See my blog here for the benefits of beetroot for endurance athletes. Continue reading

Gastro-Intestinal Problems and Endurance Sport

gut health for endurance athletesAs a nutritional therapist specialising in working with endurance athletes, people often come to see me seeking help with gastro-intestinal problems that they experience during training and, more commonly, racing. I have written briefly on this subject before with some practical tips to avoid GI problems while racing, most of which are appropriate for anyone competing in endurance sports. You can find these tips here.

I would now like to look at this issue, which affects so many athletes, in more depth. In the last few years, a number of studies have been published which suggest that there may be some additional strategies worth trying if you experience GI issues while training for or racing endurance events. Some of these are designed specifically to help mitigate the effects of strenuous exercise on the gut. Others may be appropriate if you suffer from chronic digestive health issues, which are then exacerbated during racing. In this blog, I am going to look firstly at the types of gut problems that may be experienced and why this occurs, and secondly at some strategies that may be worth trying to prevent these problems from affecting your race, based on the latest research. Continue reading

Recipe – Mackerel and Sweet Potato

recipes for endurance athletes

This is one of my favourite evening meals, filling and nourishing after a day with a long or hard training session. The mackerel is a great source of both protein (19g/100g) to help repair muscle and healthy omega 3 fats to support heart, joint, immune and brain function. Sweet potato provides carbs (20g/100g – a serving is 200g) to replenish glycogen stores together with fibre to maintain a healthy gut and a range of vitamins such as beta carotene, which is important for eye health. I’ve added tenderstem broccoli and leeks for additional plant nutrients, so this recipe provides 3 servings of vegetables. I’ve also included maple syrup for flavour and some additional carbohydrate (10g/tbsp)

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